SEEKING THE SUPPORT OF RELIGIOUS BODIES

Christian Denominations collectively have the longest association, the most granular contacts, the furthest reach, the most systematic communication and regular personal interaction with communities compared to any other type of organisations in Jamaica. The influence of the Christian Denominations collectively goes beyond their membership and regular visitors. Even Jamaicans who are not Christians, or who are nominal, have close personal relations, regular churchgoers. They are most likely to hear about aspects of Sunday and Saturday sermons, matters discussed at weekly Bible study and issues raised at prayer meetings. Further, many denominations are involved in community outreach activities, programs, and projects. As a consequence, the Electoral Advisory Committee, in its preparation for the General Elections of 2002, deliberately sought the support of Christian denominations. Continue reading

THE ELECTION CENTRE

COORDINATING AND MANAGING THE ELECTORAL PROCESS FROM NOMINATION DAY TO ELECTION DAY

THE ORIGINAL PROPOSAL

Currently, all stakeholders and actors in the electoral process operate with minimal or, at best, very modest interaction during the period between Nomination Day and Election Day. Accordingly, many matters that could be readily addressed are not dealt with leading to frustration on the part of those who perceive themselves to be aggrieved; the taking of unilateral action that aggravate and compound the situation; and the generation of anecdotes of electoral malpractices whose repetition undermine the integrity of the electoral process. While this lack of coordination may not be detrimental in circumstances in which there is a high degree of trust in the electoral process, between the stakeholders and actors, it represents a serious deficiency in circumstances where a high degree of trust is absent, as is currently the case in Jamaica. Continue reading