Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean

Book Cover: Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean
Part of the institute of social and economic research series:

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

Institute of Social and Economic Research, UWI Mona: Jamaica with the Assistance of the Research Institute for the Study of Man, New York, USA: 1991

The Foreword is by Sir Alister McIntyre Vice Chancellor of the University of the West Indies

Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean is a review of research relating to achievement, access, and socialization as these impact educational performance in selected Commonwealth Caribbean countries. Chapters are:

Preface by Errol Miller

RISM and Caribbean Social Science by Lambros Comitas

RISM-Spencer Study of Education and Society in the Caribbean by M G Smith

Education and Society in the Caribbean: Issues and Problems by Rex Nettleford

Education and Society in St Kitts and Nevis by Joseph Halliday

Education and Society in Grenada by George I Brizan

A Review of Research on Access to Education and Educational Achievement in Barbados by Anthony Layne

A Review of Educational Research in Jamaica by Marlene Hamilton

Education and Society: A Review of Educational Research in Trinidad and Tobago by Patricia Mohammed

Access to High School Education in Postwar Jamaica by Derek Gordon

Education and Society in the Caribbean: Some Reflections by Errol Miller

In addition to Tables reporting data in several chapters, this books also has 45 pages of Tables reporting data related to different aspects of the education systems of Grenada, St Kitts and Nevis, Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago in the 1980s.

Please indicate interest by submitting your email address, the title of the publication and we will update you on any progress.

This entry was posted in . Bookmark the permalink.

Gender and the Family

Some Theoretical Considerations

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

Gender and the Family: Some Theoretical Considerations. (1998) In Gender and the Family in the Caribbean. Editor: Wilma Bailey. Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica. Pp 1-31

Gender and the Family attempts to set out an appropriate theoretical framework in which to interpret and explain data and research findings on gender and the family, with special reference to shortcomings of existing theories as applied to Caribbean data. Patriarchy is defined in terms of genealogy, generation, and gender. Genealogy establishes the external boundaries of patriarchal collectives. Generation and gender establish internal rank within the kinship collective. Family is identified historically as one variety of patriarchal kinship collectives. Gender is defined principally in terms of the sexual division of power and not of labour. From this perspective gender issues are shown as not restricted solely to women’s issues but also includes marginalisation of alien men, that is, men outside of the covenant of kinship.

The position is taken that the nation-state organized on the basis of the individual as the unit of organisation and the transcendental values of equality, individual constitutional rights and social justice is in fundamental conflict with civil society structure on the basis of the family as the unit of organisation and patriarchal roles, authority and obligations as the foundation of action. This dialectic combined with the conflict and contest between groups for power and position in the nation are shown to be the major sources of transformation in the structure of the society including gender and family relations.

Two processes are identified. One is partnership between the men and women of dominant groups to advance or maintain the interests and position of their group. The other is a partial exclusion of males of the subordinate groups from the mainstream of upward social mobility opportunities in preference for the females of this group. The societal outcomes are the phenomena of feminization and male marginalisation within the nation-state.

The framework constructed is then used to explain examples of seemingly contradictory research findings concerning the family and gender that have been reported in research on these topics and themes in the Caribbean.

Please indicate interest by submitting your email address, the title of the publication and we will update you on any progress.

This entry was posted in . Bookmark the permalink.

Jamaican Society and High Schooling

1990. Institute of Social and Economic Research University of the West Indies, Mona. Kingston Jamaica.

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

Jamaican Society and High Schooling

Published by the Institute of Social and Economic Research of the University of the West Indies, Mona Kingston Jamaica, 1990

Jamaican Society and High Schooling is landmark study of the history and sociology of the high school institution in Jamaica from 1850 to 1985. The study described and discussed the major policies and reforms that guided the inauguration and evolution of the public high school system over the 145 year period. This includes the creation of the Jamaica Schools Commission in 1879 with the mandate to establish public high schools from trust schools; the inclusion in 1920 of schools founded by Christian Denominations in the public system through a Grants-in-Aid Scheme; and the reforms of 1957 and adjustments in 1964. Regarding empirical data of public high school students, the study examined the socioeconomic backgrounds inclusive of race, class, gender, and residence. For the period 1940 to 1985 this study collected and analyzed data of 14, 974 students who entered 26 high schools in the years 1942, 1952, 1962, 1972 and 1982 in order to track social changes among students entering high schools over the 40 year period.  Regarding high school teachers, the study examined their nationality, gender, teaching experience, academic and professional qualifications in relation to the geographic location of high schools. The study also examined classified wanted advertisements for the period 1900 to 1980 in the only daily newspaper that operated continuously during this time and identified the explicit statements made with respect to the race, class, gender, academic and professional qualifications of persons wanted or applying for work. These data were compared with Census data on the labour force of 1943 and 1960 and Annual Labour Force Statistics for the period 1975 to 1985. The focus of these comparisons were the socioeconomic backgrounds, gender, and qualifications of persons employed in the labour force. The empirical data gathered by the study are interpreted by the Theory of Place, which the author outlines in Chapter 2. The Book includes the Occupational Coding Scheme that was developed and used to classify students into six socioeconomic categories.

Please indicate interest by submitting your email address, the title of the publication and we will update you on any progress.

This entry was posted in . Bookmark the permalink.