Feminization of Elementary School Teaching in the Commonwealth Caribbean.

First published titled The Feminisation of Elementary School Teaching in the Commonwealth Caribbean. (1998) Institute of Education Annual Volume 1: Editor Ruby King. Institute of Education University of the West Indies, Kingston Jamaica: Pp 3-42.

There are few studies that have been done of the feminization of teaching outside of North America. This study traces the gender composition of elementary school teachers in private and public schools in the Commonwealth Caribbean over the 150 odd-year period 1837 to 1995. It uses the Latrobe Report of 1837-38 as its base and official reports and documents thereafter. The paper documents and critiques the explanation of the feminization of teaching in North America and offers an alternative conceptual framework. It then documents the gender composition of elementary school teachers in private and public schools in the Bahamas, Barbados, Grenada, Jamaica, St Vincent, Trinidad and also Tobago. It then examines the feminization of elementary school teaching in the Commonwealth Caribbean within the conceptual frameworks outlined in the study.

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

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Literacy in Jamaica

An overview

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

In Libraries, Literacy and Learning Essays in Honour of the Hon. Joyce Robinson. Editor K. E. Ingram. Jamaica Library Association. Kingston: 1994 Pp 17 – 47.

Literacy in Jamaica: An overview traced how literacy was defined and measured in Jamaica over the period 1861 to 1987.  As such this Chapter described how literacy was first measured in the Census of 1861 and in subsequent censuses. It also looks at the ages at which literacy was measured; literacy and gender, literacy and geographical location, and literacy, gender and geographic location. It also discussed the impact on literacy rates of the Jamaican population when the standard of measuring literacy changed from the basis to the functional standard in the 1960s. Further, the Chapter includes the stigma and stereotypes ascribed to literary, regional and international comparisons and as well as the contribution of schooling to literacy and adult literacy programmes that have been implemented in Jamaica. In this regard special attention to the JAMAL programme implemented in 1975, to which the Hon. Joyce Robinson made a seminal contribution.

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Teacher turnover in schools in the reform of secondary education project, 1993-1997

Book Cover: Teacher turnover in schools in the reform of secondary education project, 1993-1997

Looks at the ROSE Project in Jamaica between 1993 and 1998, examining teacher attrition from the project schools as well as the re-deployment of teachers within the project schools. The purpose was to understand why, although the number of teachers trained to teach the five subjects in grades 7 to 9 in the 124 project schools almost equalled the number of teachers deployed to carry out these instructional responsibilites in those schools, after four years 40.2 percent of the teachers remained untrained. The study found that attrition from the schools was relatively low and that it is re-development of teachers within the schools and not attrition from the schools that account for the turnover of teachers teaching the five subjects in which they had been trained by the project. This paper should be of particular interest to school supervisors and administrators.

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Making Changes :CETT as a catalyst

CETT as a Catalyst for Regional Reform of Teacher Education Policy and Practices

Making Changes: CETT as a Catalyst for Regional Reform of Teacher Education Policy and Practices: (2006) In, Broadening the Vision of Teacher Education in the Caribbean. Editors Rose Davies and Lorna Down. Institute of Education Publication Series No. 2. Institute of Education University of the West Indies Mona, Kingston Jamaica. Pp 44 – 62

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID), through the Summit of the Americas Initiative 2001 proposed by President George Bush, sponsored the Centers of Excellence in Teacher Training (CETT) in Latin America and the Caribbean with the expressed purpose of improving the teachers of reading in Grades 1 to 3. The assumption of this initiative was that achieving excellence in the teaching of reading in the early grades of primary education was of great strategic importance in teaching students to read by the end of Grade 3 which was critical to the overall improvement of primary education given the centrality of reading in the curriculum. Three CETTs were established: the Andean; Central American and Caribbean. The three CETTs were mandated to target schools serving disadvantaged communities. Each CETT was given the autonomy to design itself and to operate in accordance with the imperatives of its region.

Making Changes briefly describes the general components of the CETT initiative and the five main components for which resources were provided but gives details of the Caribbean CETT in terms of:

  1. Its location in the Joint Boards of Teacher Education (JBTE) of the Schools of Education of the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, and Mona campuses, but with its headquarters at JBTE, Mona
  2. Its organizational structure
  3. The three major strategies employed and the initial implementations of these strategies
  4. Challenges encountered in implementation in the five countries in which it was first established namely Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, St Lucia and St Vincent and the Grenadines
  5. Early accomplishments.
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