Education/Training in the New Workplace

Some Introductory Remarks

Book Cover: Education/Training in the New Workplace

In Human Resource Development and Workplace Governance in the Caribbean. Edited by Noel Cowell and Clement Branche. 2002. Ian Randle Publishers: Kingston Pp 37-43

This Chapter poses some basic questions about education, training and the new workplace.

These questions are:

  • Is the workplace the main aim of education and training?
  • Should education and training occur only prior to the workplace?
  • Is the new workplace axiomatic and education and training the problematic?
  • Where is the new workplace?
  • Are not jobs, work and virtual reality not more problematic than education and training?
  • Are the old distinctions between academic education and vocational training still useful?
  • Will the institutional framework for delivering education and training not change substantially over the next decades?
  • How should education and training be redesigned to give Caribbean people maximum opportunity to benefit from high-wage work that is and will be generated?
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Caribbean Regionalism, Education and Marginality

Book Cover: Caribbean Regionalism, Education and Marginality

In, The Challenge of Scale: Educational Development in the Small States of the Commonwealth Caribbean. Editors Kazim Bacchus and Colin Brock. 1987. Commonwealth Secretariat: London. Pp 127-139

Small size, isolation, and dependence have been themes that have been employed in discussing educational development in small states of the Commonwealth. This chapter argues that these themes are defining manifestations of the more basic condition of marginality. As such the chapter discusses the general notion of marginality and considers its implications in education in the Caribbean over the previous 40 years. It critically analyzes the quantitative increase in educational provision in the region which basically makes larger the educational systems that were inherited but leaves many of its qualitative features in place. Important region-wide projects and well as the University of the West Indies and the Caribbean Examination Council have demonstrated the value of regional cooperation. The chapter concludes with the notion that the Caribbean was at the ‘cross-roads’ with education needing to be separated from partisan and insular politics and embrace regional cooperation as an imperative.

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Pillars for Partnership and Progress

The OECS Education Strategy to 2010

Book Cover: Pillars for Partnership and Progress

Errol Miller, Didacus Jules and Leton Thomas. OECS Reform Unit, OECS Secretariat. Funded by The Department for International Development Caribbean DFID. December 2000

Pillars for Partnership and Progress is the OECS long-term education reform strategy for the period 2000 to 2010. It follows on directly from Foundation for the Future which was the first stage of the education reform strategy for the sub-region. As such Pillars for Partnership and Progress is the second stage of the reform of education in the OECS. The metaphor of pillars builds out on the metaphor of foundation, assuming that the latter had been laid.

Pillars for Partnership and Progress was designed and developed after a comprehensive assessment of Foundation for the Future using an evaluation framework prescribed by DFIDC in which participants from all nine countries of the OECS assessed what had been achieved in implementing the strategies of Foundation for the Future in their country. The assessment and evaluation exercise of Foundation for the Future were led and coordinated by Miller, Jules, and Thomas who then proceeded to lead the process for the development of Pillars for Partnership and Progress.

Essentially Pillars for Partnership and Progress adopts the nine strategic areas of Foundation for the Future and adds other two areas: information and communication technologies and urgent social imperatives. Urgent societal imperatives include education strategies that address natural disasters, health promoting schools, gender equity, retaining boys in schools and partnership as the prescribed modality of implementation. In total Pillars for Partnership and Progress proposed 77 strategies grouped into eleven strategic areas.

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In-Service Teacher Education in the Caribbean

Book Cover: In-Service Teacher Education in the Caribbean

(1990) Editor. CARNEID, Barbados. 72 pages.

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

Please indicate interest by submitting your email address, the title of the publication and we will update you on any progress.

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Teacher Education: The Partnership between UWI and Teachers Colleges

The Partnership between the University of the West Indies and Teachers Colleges

Caribbean Journal of Education, Vol 23, Nos 1 and 2, 2001: Pp 73-88.

Teacher Education: The Partnership between the University of the West Indies and Teachers Colleges share similar content to Colleges Training Teachers and the School of Education, UWI. However, it omits the brief historical sketch of the evolution of teacher education in the Commonwealth Caribbean and starts with the creation of the training of secondary school teachers in 1952 in the Department of Education. Its focus is on the School of Education, Mona and the partnership with national colleges in the Western Caribbean, particularly in Jamaica. The 1990s was a turning point in teacher education particularly in the Western Caribbean and this paper updates the dialogue taking place in the closing years of the 20th century and the turn of the 21st century.

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