Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean

Book Cover: Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean
Part of the institute of social and economic research series:

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

Institute of Social and Economic Research, UWI Mona: Jamaica with the Assistance of the Research Institute for the Study of Man, New York, USA: 1991

The Foreword is by Sir Alister McIntyre Vice Chancellor of the University of the West Indies

Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean is a review of research relating to achievement, access, and socialization as these impact educational performance in selected Commonwealth Caribbean countries. Chapters are:

Preface by Errol Miller

RISM and Caribbean Social Science by Lambros Comitas

RISM-Spencer Study of Education and Society in the Caribbean by M G Smith

Education and Society in the Caribbean: Issues and Problems by Rex Nettleford

Education and Society in St Kitts and Nevis by Joseph Halliday

Education and Society in Grenada by George I Brizan

A Review of Research on Access to Education and Educational Achievement in Barbados by Anthony Layne

A Review of Educational Research in Jamaica by Marlene Hamilton

Education and Society: A Review of Educational Research in Trinidad and Tobago by Patricia Mohammed

Access to High School Education in Postwar Jamaica by Derek Gordon

Education and Society in the Caribbean: Some Reflections by Errol Miller

In addition to Tables reporting data in several chapters, this books also has 45 pages of Tables reporting data related to different aspects of the education systems of Grenada, St Kitts and Nevis, Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago in the 1980s.

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Elementary School Teachers and the Liberation of Women

Book Cover: Elementary School Teachers and the Liberation of Women

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Elementary School Teachers and the Liberation of Women: (1992) Kingston: Shortwood Teachers' College.

Elementary School Teachers and the Liberation of Women examines women’s general historic disadvantage in society and their evolving liberation from these inequalities and injustices. It makes references to the protest of individual women to women’s disadvantage in different eras as well as the collective action of women to remove these disadvantages and link these movements to other movements to address other types of inequities, inequalities, and injustices in society. It raises the issue of the role of structural factors versus individual and collective action by aggrieved persons in the social transformation of society. It asserts that Caribbean data and experience confound the orthodoxy that industrialization, urbanization, national sovereignty and class struggle are the causal factors that explain women’s liberation and the spread of schooling in the world.

Elementary School Teachers and the Liberation of Women offers an alternative theoretical explanation of the transformation of society over time. Using UNESCO Statistics reporting a global snapshot of the gender of elementary school teachers in most countries of the world and historical data on the gender of elementary school teachers over the 150 year period 1830s to 1980s in Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad and the United States, the Monograph asserts that the relationship between the gender of elementary school teachers and the extent of women’s liberation in society is neither haphazard nor fickle but rational and consistent.

It concludes by making two major claims. First is that changes in the gender composition of elementary school teachers is a social barometer of changes in gender roles and relationships in society. Second is that the founding of Shortwood Teachers College for Ladies by men in 1885, at the height of the first feminist movement and which it survived, marked a turning point in the liberation of women of African ancestry in Jamaica and the Caribbean.

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Jamaican Society and High Schooling

1990. Institute of Social and Economic Research University of the West Indies, Mona. Kingston Jamaica.

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

Jamaican Society and High Schooling

Published by the Institute of Social and Economic Research of the University of the West Indies, Mona Kingston Jamaica, 1990

Jamaican Society and High Schooling is landmark study of the history and sociology of the high school institution in Jamaica from 1850 to 1985. The study described and discussed the major policies and reforms that guided the inauguration and evolution of the public high school system over the 145 year period. This includes the creation of the Jamaica Schools Commission in 1879 with the mandate to establish public high schools from trust schools; the inclusion in 1920 of schools founded by Christian Denominations in the public system through a Grants-in-Aid Scheme; and the reforms of 1957 and adjustments in 1964. Regarding empirical data of public high school students, the study examined the socioeconomic backgrounds inclusive of race, class, gender, and residence. For the period 1940 to 1985 this study collected and analyzed data of 14, 974 students who entered 26 high schools in the years 1942, 1952, 1962, 1972 and 1982 in order to track social changes among students entering high schools over the 40 year period.  Regarding high school teachers, the study examined their nationality, gender, teaching experience, academic and professional qualifications in relation to the geographic location of high schools. The study also examined classified wanted advertisements for the period 1900 to 1980 in the only daily newspaper that operated continuously during this time and identified the explicit statements made with respect to the race, class, gender, academic and professional qualifications of persons wanted or applying for work. These data were compared with Census data on the labour force of 1943 and 1960 and Annual Labour Force Statistics for the period 1975 to 1985. The focus of these comparisons were the socioeconomic backgrounds, gender, and qualifications of persons employed in the labour force. The empirical data gathered by the study are interpreted by the Theory of Place, which the author outlines in Chapter 2. The Book includes the Occupational Coding Scheme that was developed and used to classify students into six socioeconomic categories.

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