Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean

Book Cover: Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean
Part of the institute of social and economic research series:

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

Institute of Social and Economic Research, UWI Mona: Jamaica with the Assistance of the Research Institute for the Study of Man, New York, USA: 1991

The Foreword is by Sir Alister McIntyre Vice Chancellor of the University of the West Indies

Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean is a review of research relating to achievement, access, and socialization as these impact educational performance in selected Commonwealth Caribbean countries. Chapters are:

Preface by Errol Miller

RISM and Caribbean Social Science by Lambros Comitas

RISM-Spencer Study of Education and Society in the Caribbean by M G Smith

Education and Society in the Caribbean: Issues and Problems by Rex Nettleford

Education and Society in St Kitts and Nevis by Joseph Halliday

Education and Society in Grenada by George I Brizan

A Review of Research on Access to Education and Educational Achievement in Barbados by Anthony Layne

A Review of Educational Research in Jamaica by Marlene Hamilton

Education and Society: A Review of Educational Research in Trinidad and Tobago by Patricia Mohammed

Access to High School Education in Postwar Jamaica by Derek Gordon

Education and Society in the Caribbean: Some Reflections by Errol Miller

In addition to Tables reporting data in several chapters, this books also has 45 pages of Tables reporting data related to different aspects of the education systems of Grenada, St Kitts and Nevis, Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago in the 1980s.

Please indicate interest by submitting your email address, the title of the publication and we will update you on any progress.

This entry was posted in . Bookmark the permalink.

Elementary School Teachers and the Liberation of Women

Book Cover: Elementary School Teachers and the Liberation of Women

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

Elementary School Teachers and the Liberation of Women: (1992) Kingston: Shortwood Teachers' College.

Elementary School Teachers and the Liberation of Women examines women’s general historic disadvantage in society and their evolving liberation from these inequalities and injustices. It makes references to the protest of individual women to women’s disadvantage in different eras as well as the collective action of women to remove these disadvantages and link these movements to other movements to address other types of inequities, inequalities, and injustices in society. It raises the issue of the role of structural factors versus individual and collective action by aggrieved persons in the social transformation of society. It asserts that Caribbean data and experience confound the orthodoxy that industrialization, urbanization, national sovereignty and class struggle are the causal factors that explain women’s liberation and the spread of schooling in the world.

Elementary School Teachers and the Liberation of Women offers an alternative theoretical explanation of the transformation of society over time. Using UNESCO Statistics reporting a global snapshot of the gender of elementary school teachers in most countries of the world and historical data on the gender of elementary school teachers over the 150 year period 1830s to 1980s in Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad and the United States, the Monograph asserts that the relationship between the gender of elementary school teachers and the extent of women’s liberation in society is neither haphazard nor fickle but rational and consistent.

It concludes by making two major claims. First is that changes in the gender composition of elementary school teachers is a social barometer of changes in gender roles and relationships in society. Second is that the founding of Shortwood Teachers College for Ladies by men in 1885, at the height of the first feminist movement and which it survived, marked a turning point in the liberation of women of African ancestry in Jamaica and the Caribbean.

Please indicate interest by submitting your email address, the title of the publication and we will update you on any progress.

This entry was posted in . Bookmark the permalink.

Research and Higher Education Policies for the Transformation of Societies

Perspectives from the Anglophone Caribbean

Book Cover: Research and Higher Education Policies for the Transformation of Societies

Research and Higher Education Policies for the Transformation of Societies: Perspectives from the Anglophone Caribbean is the keynote address at the UNESCO Forum on Higher Education, Research and Knowledge held in Trinidad and Tobago in July 2007. It essentially does the following:

  1. Contrasts the development of Higher Education in the Spanish Caribbean and North America with the Anglophone Caribbean highlighting the 300-year difference in its commencement in the latter. Notes the meagre provision for higher education by the British over the period 1830 and 1948 and locates the impetus for the modern development and diversification of higher education in the Anglophone Caribbean to adult suffrage and representative government beginning in 1948.
  2. Outlines three periods in the modern era: the founding of the single regional university, the University College of the West Indies, in 1948; the establishment of national universities starting with the University of Guyana in 1963; and private for profit universities starting with the St Georges University Medical School in Grenada in 1976.
  3. Traces the origin of the development of research capacity and knowledge generation in the Anglophone Caribbean to the creation of the St Vincent Botanical Gardens in 1765 and the Bath Botanical Gardens in Jamaica in 1779 and followed by the Imperial College of Agriculture in Trinidad and the Farm School in Jamaica in the first two decades of the 20th century.
  4. Adopts the imperatives driving Caribbean transformation presented by Barbados Prime Minister Owen Arthur in his address to the Conference on the Caribbean in the 21 Century Conference in June 2007 held in Washington DC.
  5. Discusses issues related to policies for the further development of research and higher education in the Anglophone Caribbean with respect to process and timeframe; demographic factors; regional cooperation; Caribbean integration; and the Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME);
  6. These discussions include references to the findings and recommendation from the First Septennial Review of the University of Technology and notions such as the Anglophone Caribbean being both place and people; not being either North American or Latin American; and that current geopolitics is forcing the twelve independent Anglophone countries, Haiti and Surinam into a common space and imposing on them a shared destiny.
This entry was posted in . Bookmark the permalink.

Pillars for Partnership and Progress

The OECS Education Strategy to 2010

Book Cover: Pillars for Partnership and Progress

Errol Miller, Didacus Jules and Leton Thomas. OECS Reform Unit, OECS Secretariat. Funded by The Department for International Development Caribbean DFID. December 2000

Pillars for Partnership and Progress is the OECS long-term education reform strategy for the period 2000 to 2010. It follows on directly from Foundation for the Future which was the first stage of the education reform strategy for the sub-region. As such Pillars for Partnership and Progress is the second stage of the reform of education in the OECS. The metaphor of pillars builds out on the metaphor of foundation, assuming that the latter had been laid.

Pillars for Partnership and Progress was designed and developed after a comprehensive assessment of Foundation for the Future using an evaluation framework prescribed by DFIDC in which participants from all nine countries of the OECS assessed what had been achieved in implementing the strategies of Foundation for the Future in their country. The assessment and evaluation exercise of Foundation for the Future were led and coordinated by Miller, Jules, and Thomas who then proceeded to lead the process for the development of Pillars for Partnership and Progress.

Essentially Pillars for Partnership and Progress adopts the nine strategic areas of Foundation for the Future and adds other two areas: information and communication technologies and urgent social imperatives. Urgent societal imperatives include education strategies that address natural disasters, health promoting schools, gender equity, retaining boys in schools and partnership as the prescribed modality of implementation. In total Pillars for Partnership and Progress proposed 77 strategies grouped into eleven strategic areas.

This entry was posted in . Bookmark the permalink.

In-Service Teacher Education in the Caribbean

Book Cover: In-Service Teacher Education in the Caribbean

(1990) Editor. CARNEID, Barbados. 72 pages.

This Publication is not currently in Print or available in Electronic Form. Should there be sufficient interest, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining the necessary permission to make it available in electronic form, either free or at the lowest cost.

Please indicate interest by submitting your email address, the title of the publication and we will update you on any progress.

This entry was posted in . Bookmark the permalink.